Racing podcast

Exclusive interview with Gold Logie winner and motor racing driver Grant Denyer.

In RACQ’s latest podcast, we take you trackside to cover all things racing from round two of the Australian production Cars Series at Queensland Raceway.

RACQ sat down with Gold Logie winner and race car driver, Grant Denyer, Super cars co-driver Tony D’Alberto, and Sherrin Racing category manager and driver Iain Sherrin.

The podcast covered everything from what it took to become a race car driver, the training involved, how drivers cope following a crash and more.

 

Listen now

  

Q:

Now guys you have, arguably, one of the coolest jobs in the world,the type of thing that kids dream of, and I'm sure many adults still dream of, how'd you get involved in racing?

A:

Grant Denyer: "Did a lot of growing up on a farm, started learning to drive at seven, on the tractor at 12, homemade go kart, and decided to then instead of just skidding around sideways around the sheds, thought we would go around a racetrack. It just went in go karts, and won a state title, and then sort of just went up through the circuit racing ranks from Utes, to super cars and production cars."

Q:

It's far from a cheap sport racing. How did you guys get involved - did you speak sponsorship?

A:

Grant Denyer: "Usually family supports you up to a certain point to get you started. I only got into television, to be honest, to try and find sponsors to further my racing career. Because, you know, I wasn't from a family that had any money, really. And I thought, how do I pay the bills in Motorsport? Get a good sponsor. I had to get a good sponsor and if I'm on television, probably a good chance I can find a sponsor. Only reason I got into television in the first place, but my career managed to take off. So, I was pretty lucky."

 

Q:

like many other sports, there must be a lot of training that is involved in this. How do you guys prepare for these races?

A:

Tony D’Alberto: "I do a bit of running and cycling and all that sort of cardiovascular work, because, you know, it gets pretty hot in the car, you're working pretty hard behind the wheel. A lot of people think "he's just sitting behind a steering wheel like they do when they drive to work and how tiring can it be?" But you're basically in a sauna. It's generally 20-30 degrees hotter in the car than what it is the ambient temperature. And that's a lot of stress for the body too to take on. You know, you're doing maybe a hundred gear changes a lap, big brake pressure every single stop. You know, this track here in particular, got some massive braking areas, so it's very repetitious, and tomorrow we've got a 90 odd lap race. So you need to be able to back it up and keep that concentration going."